Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Antigone Scene 1, Ode 1

Please explain, stanza by stanza, why Ode 1 pertains to Scene 1. Write your draft, and then edit and proofread before posting it here. Your grade will depend on the quality of your thoughts and on convincing details from Sophocles' text.

23 comments:

  1. Stanza 1 in Ode 1 pertains to the world’s wonders, but it only talks about the most valued wonder; which is man. This stanza has many personifications of how wonderful man is. For example one line reads, “More wonderful than man; the storm-gray sea yields to his prows, the huge crests bear him high” (760). This part of the stanza creates a personification of man being powerful. This 1st Stanza refers to the beginning of scene 1; where creon is ruler and is above all subjects. Just like “the huge crests bear him high”, like a ruler.

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  2. The first stanza in Ode 1 explains that man is the most powerful and that they are most wonderful of the world’s wonders. This relates to Scene 1 because man because they are most respectful to one another. Creon places Eteocles in a nice burial that is formal and neat. Man is superior to all because in scene 1 Creon is the leader, and he is superior to his people by setting rules and saying a long speech. The next stanza explains that man is also superior to his surroundings, because in Scene 1 Creon tells his people what to do and what is right by telling them that the gods didn’t give Polyneices a right burial. The next stanza explains that man cannot control death. In scene 1 Creon explains that the brothers Eteocles and Polynieces killed eachother in battle fighting for the throne. They cannot control themselves by settling the situation so they bring death to the situation. The next stanza shows that the laws limit man. This limits them because in scene 1 the laws are given from Creon to not respect people that disrespect his people. But “someone” went against that law and gave Polynieces a proper burial. Ode 1 relates to Scene 1 in every stanza.

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  3. In Ode 1 it talks about human beings the most wonderful of the worldʻs wonders. That relates to Scene 1, of Creon being very powerful and the greatest. Deciding who will live or die, based on what law they did not follow. Ode 1 also talks about the human mind and how vast it is containing thoughts of birds, fish, lions, and horses. In Scene 1 lines 133-137, it says " the man who has done this thing shall pay for it! Find that man, bring him here to me, or your death will be the least of your problems: Iʻll string you up Alive, and there will be certain ways to make you Discover your employer before you die;" this shows the train of thought.

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  4. The first stanza of Scene 1 compared to Ode 1 is some what similar. Ode 1 refers to a boat moving forward through the waters of the rough seas, as well as humans being the most wonderful creature on the planet. It also speaks of animals being manipulated to help people with agriculture. Compared to Scene 1 when Creon speaks about the ship that has just arrived at the harbor after it has encountered multiple hardships through the ship’s journey.

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  5. In Ode 1 the Chorus heavily relates their lyrics to Scene 1 with poetic technique. In the first stanza the Chorus speaks of the human race as if we are the dominant species of the world, ruling effortlessly. This relates to Scene 1 because the main conflict involves the ruler, Creon. The second stanza is somewhat similar to the first regarding the topic of human dominance, in greater detail. In the third stanza, the Chorus combines a warlike atmosphere with the extreme, harsh conditions of mother nature leading to man's inevitable fall; death. This relates to Scene 1 because Polyneices and Eteocles both died in battle as enemies. The last stanza explains how the law of a city is very important to maintain any structure in their society. This pertains to Antigone going against Creon's law by acting with morality and doing what she believed was right; providing a burial for her brother and honoring his life.

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  6. Ode 1 pertains to Scene 1 because both of these sections were similar on how Creon says, “Gentlemen: I have the honor to inform you that our Ship of State, which recent storms have threatened to destroy.” And in Ode 1 Chorus says, “the storm-gray sea yields to his prows.” These two stanzas were related by the speech of the sea and how the sea is a very powerful place. I saw some metaphors in both of these, because both stanzas talked about the sea as a really powerful place. I also saw another relation in the stanzas because in Ode 1 says “Earth, holy and inexhaustible, is graven” and in Scene 1 they talk about how Creon becomes King by having many battles fought without him fighting and how the earth is holy and is a graven place. The earth is a graven place because before Creon had took the throne he had to have a plan to kill the two brothers of Oedipius. But instead of doing that the two brothers desired the throne because you would get a lot of money and/or high royalty. This caused a war in which the two brothers killed each other and Creon claimed the throne. In which the earth has been holy to Creon by helping him claim the throne.

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  7. The similarities between ode 1 and scene 1 are astronomical. Sophocles suggests that each ode is used as a brief summary to wrap up his thoughts pertaining to the corresponding scene and a place to input his own notions. Sophocles cites men as the world’s wonders who put the holiness of the earth as a past concept. Line 756 of Antigone says, “If that is your will . . . you have the right to enforce it: we are yours” Line 756 shows that the people of Creon are respectful to him as their ruler. Controversy spawns when Creon gives Eteocles a burial with military honors and a soldier’s funeral while Polyneices fought as brave as Eteocles but will get no type of funeral because Creon’s decree.

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  8. Stanza 18 of the Ode relates to Scene one where the king talks about the fight between Polyneices and Eteocles. The two brothers died which relates to what the Ode says,"In the late wind of death he cannot stand." The two brothers couldnʻt stand up to death.
    In stanzas 21 and 22 of the Ode relates to scene one where the king finds out about the burial of Polyneices. King Creon said that Polyneicesʻ body couldnʻt be touched. Someone decided to bury Polyneicesʻ body which was against the rules. Stanza 21 says, "When the laws are kept, how proudly his city stands. If nobody buried the body, everything would be fine. Stanza 22 says, "When the laws are broken, what of his city then?" Somebody did break the law and the king is angry an confused.

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  9. I agree with you because Antigone broke the law to support her brother in desperate need. Pertaining to the battle of Polyneices and Eteocles jealousy has overcome brotherhood.

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  10. Leila Kila^_^
    The similarities between scene 1 and ode 1 is just awesome(: In the third stanza it talks about how important and meaningful words are. In the play Creonʻs words are more important then Choragos and Sentryʻs words. For example it says, "This is my command, and you can see the wisdom behind it. As long as I am King, no traitor is going to be honored witht he loyal man." (Pg: 756 Line: 50) Creonʻs words are more powerful then Choragos and Sentryʻs words because he is ruler over them.

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  11. The first stanza of Ode 1 explains that out of all the world’s wonders, man is the greatest. In the first stanza, the Chorus says “the storm-gray sea/ Yields to his prows” (760). This line refers directly to the beginning of Scene 1 when Creon says that the ship has returned. The ship surviving the storms compares directly to the references of the sea yielding to man’s boat. On a deeper level, this same stanza can be a metaphor. Man being above all other creatures can compare to how leadership and government rule above all people. Creon controls all others; for example he yells at the Sentry for a crime the Sentry did not commit. Creon’s control of people compares to how Ode 1 says that man is in control of all other creatures.

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  12. Stanza 1 of Ode 1 praises man and the accomplishments of humans in a general perspective. It compares man to a ship and the obstacles overcome in life to the storm with high waves that pose challenges to the ship at sea. It compares the hard work of man and the generations of hard workers to the timeless labor of stallions. This relates to Scene 1 because in this section, King Creon is praising his people for overcoming the difficulties of adjusting to a new ruler. He honors their loyalty and their dedication to the previous kings. King Creon is able to set many laws and rules in order to govern his land, one of many leadership skills held by man. Scene 1 also makes a reference to a “Ship of State” and “recent storms” when King Creon is delivering his speech. This alludes to the first stanza of the ode when the metaphor of the ship and sea are described.

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  13. The first stanza of Ode 1 explains how man is the greatest wonder of the world: “Numberless are the world’s wonders, but none/ More wonderful than man; the storm-gray sea/ Yields to his prows, the huge crests bear him high;” (Page 760 Lines 1-3). The first stanza of Ode 1 relates to Scene 1 because in the beginning of Scene 1 Creon tells the people that he is the new King and he has full power of the throne. Now that Creon is King, he is the greatest man. Ode 1 depicts man as the most powerful and wonderful thing of the world, and that is how Creon portrays himself in Scene 1 when he speaks to the people. He shows his power and control by letting all the people know what is expected of them and what they will get in return if they obey his expectations.

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  14. The first stanza of Ode 1 pertains to Scene 1 by its praise of man, the most wonderful of the world’s wonders. This stanza is filled with many personifications as it describes the power of man over the earth and sea. Man is described to be so great that the “storm-gray sea” would yield unto him and bear him high. This stanza pertains to Scene 1 as it is a possible description of Creon, whom the Chorus has so willingly sided with in its support of him. In the first scene, Creon secures his position with the Choragos, ensuring their support of his new decree against the burial of Polyneices. As their loyalty shifts from Eteocles to Creon, the Chorus praises their new leader and glorifies his characteristics as their new king.

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  15. The final stanza of Ode 1 pertains to Scene 1 the most. Creon strongly believes that one should be loyal to the government and its rulers. Creon says, “I have contempt for the kind of Government who is afraid… to follow the course that he knows is best for the State” (755). This means that Creon feels following laws that are best for society is very important. This relates to stanza four when the Chorus says, “When the laws are kept, how proudly the city stands” (761). The Chorus is speaking its opinion that with laws, a city thrives, and without them, a city will fall. This is directly related to Creon’s belief of loyalty to the law. Another way the final stanza of Ode 1 pertains to Scene 1 is in the line “Never may the anarchic man find rest” (761). This line is an allusion to Polyneices and to the main conflict of the story. The anarchic man can refer to him because he was considered a traitor for attacking his city. Also, because they are not giving him a burial, Ode 1 pertains to Polyneices not finding rest.

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  16. Ode 1, second stanza, proclaims that man can control nature and all creatures; even the wildest animals can be tamed under man’s control to work for him. It is a metaphor relating to the people of Thebes under Creon’s control. The first line is about the creatures “clinging to cover,” which could mean that people who are scared, flee to be protected by whoever proclaims they have power or control. However, the next few lines refer to the most dominating animals in the world, like the lion, wild horse, and mountain bull, resigning to man and being obligated to work. This could symbolize the people who are dominant in society, such as the wealthy, surrendering their power to King Creon.

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  17. Stanza 1 of the first Ode to the story Antigone is an introduction into mankind’s history. It says that the wonders of the world are numerous, but man is the most wonderful of all the world’s wonders. The Chorus goes on to say that the reason for man’s wonderful aura is because the sea cannot stop their ships. Instead, the ocean waves push their ships high as if reaffirming their superiority. Furthermore, the Chorus exclaims that mankind’s wonderful aura is apparent in their grizzled agricultural endeavors that have been affixed on the sacred and inexhaustible earth. This last claim holds a very significant mentality that the modern world no longer preaches. The mindset of long ago was that mother earth was inexhaustible. This belief would go on for generations and generations, until finally somebody says “we might run out of oil” or “there’s to many people and there’s not enough water.” Is earth still inexhaustible and sacred?

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  18. Stanza three portrays the arrogance and conniving nature of Creon, which he has the luxury of having because of this powerful position of king. In scene one Creon puts fault on the Sentry who was the barer of bad news. Stanza three says, “[H]is the skill that deflects the arrows of snow” (15). His “skill”, as mentioned in this quote could be a metaphor for his skill of oppression upon his followers and the power that his words have that. In scene one it was clear that the Sentry feared what Creon was able to due to him because he continued to repeat that he was only messenger and had done nothing to wrong Creon. The third stanza also talks about “The spears of winter rain: from every wind”(17). The spears of winter rain would signify Creon's anger that someone had defied him. The dramatic Irony in the deception is that he assumes that the culprit is a man when the audience knows the criminal is a woman. In the second to the last line of the third stanza in talks about Creon being safe from all but one. This alludes to not only Antigone defying his law, but a possible further deception from her in the future.

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  19. The last stanza of Ode 1 is very different from the others; there is a shift in the tone and focus in this stanza. The perspective of this stanza seems to reflect Creon’s opinions and morals. Throughout Scene 1, Creon continuously speaks about the importance of loyalty to the State. Creon also often speaks about doing what is best for the public welfare. He believes that the public welfare should be placed above what he calls “private friendship”. His belief that the public welfare is most important is what fuels his hatred for Polyneices and is why he decided to make an example of him, which is what brought about his command to not allow any to bury his body. The Chorus in stanza four rhetorically questions the value and importance of laws. Creon, while talking to the “old men”, declares his own wisdom in creating the law to not bury Polyneices’ body. Creon’s talk about valuing the public good over private friendship is also a form of dramatic irony because the audience knows that Antigone values friendship more than the law and breaks the law because of this belief. The Chorus questions what happens to a city when its laws are broken and through Antigone this question will be answered since she broke the law. The last two lines especially sound as if it is Creon speaking because the last two lines show direct opposition to anarchist and in Scene 1 Creon believes that anarchists are scheming against him.

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  20. The fourth stanza in Ode one portrays the traits of Creon and his personality. The quote states, “Working both good and evil” (Pg.761 Line 20). Throughout scene one both the good and evil works of Creon are portrayed. For example, a good work is Creon standing up for what he believes in, by enforcing the law that no one should bury Polyneices. An example of a work that is contrasting of this is how Creon continuously blames people for burying Polyneices when he doesn’t know for sure. The third and fourth line of this stanza speaks of laws being kept and broken. This pertains to scene one because throughout this scene Creon is committed to finding who buried Polyneices, and killing the person who did this. During which he blames the Sentry for doing it.

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  21. Stanza 1 of Ode 1 talks about earth’s countless wonders, but none are greater than man himself; man is dominant over everything else in the world. Everything around him praises him and holds him high. When Creon announces his decree, this shows that he is a great superpower as King of Thebes, just as man is on Earth. When it is mentioned that Earth is holy and inexhaustible, the earth represents all that is surrounding and providing for man, which relates to all the people surrounding Creon and providing for him. The stanza also states that the earth is engraved with his plows. This relates to how Creon makes an imprint on the people around him with his actions, such as making a new law.

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  22. Stanza 2 of Ode 1 can be interpreted as a continuation of the ideas from the first stanza. In one perspective, the animals mentioned may be symbolic of all the other creatures on earth that are submissive to the creation with the utmost power, who is man. The lines “Resign to him; and his blunt yoke has broken/ The sultry shoulders of the mountain bull” (761) makes an everyday reference to a yoke, which is a wooden crosspiece that fastens animals to a plow or cart. This can be a metaphor for man’s ability to dominate over all other creatures and use this infinite power to control the smaller creatures. This may be an allusion to King Creon’s ability to enforce rules and laws upon his people. He is able to govern over a variety of people, which may be represented by the diverse animals included in the second stanza. The reference to the yoke and the mountain bull may have a deeper translation, referring to King Creon’s laws and his forceful nature can break even the strongest retaliators with rebellious and unruly characters. This also involves a sense of foreshadowing and dramatic irony. The audience knows that one woman has gone against King Creon and has found a way to rebel against the burial law. Perhaps Antigone will be able to defy the all-powerful King Creon, or perhaps she will pay the punishment for disobeying the law of the land. This stanza leaves many questions to be unanswered and allows the reader to make predictions as to what will happen next.

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  23. In Strophe one it critically compares how Creon is followed by many against their will. The reason why i believe Strophe one could be alluding to that is because the last line "Year after year, the timless labor of stallions" this stood out because stallions are usually work horses unless used by knights then they would be recognized as nobel steeds. But in this case Stallions are being called work horses which could be referring to all the people working under Creon for example, Choragos and the Sentry. In the olden days Stallions worked against their will it was their job but they were under-appreciated because they were only used for that purpose. They worked just to be respected and kept around just like how the Choragos and Sentry are. Only agreeing and patronizing with Creon to avoid his power to sentence both of them to death.

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